Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

Introduction Statement

Modesto Junior College is committed to providing an environment that is drug free for its students, staff, and community members. The purpose of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention program is to educate employees and students on the potential dangers of substance abuse, which can be potentially life threatening. Drugs and alcohol can adversely affect the body, mind and behavior, and the effects vary from person to person and from usage to usage.

The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations (Education Department General Administrative Regulations [EDGAR]), requires that any institution of higher education, receiving financial assistance under any Federal program, including participation in any federally funded or guaranteed student loan program, must certify to the Secretary that the institution has adopted, and implemented, a program to prevent the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees. The compliance manual is available here. In accordance with such regulations, Modesto Junior College has designed and implemented the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP).

This document will serve an educational resource for staff and students. In addition, this document will provide resources to both on-campus and off-campus support for staff and students seeking support. Finally, the content of this plan, it’s policies and procedures, and important referral information is outlined in the following compilation.

Procedural Information & Standing Board Policies

I. Annual Notification

At a minimum, the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) requires an annual notification in writing to all students and employees. This is accomplished by listing the following information in both the student and employee handbooks:

  1. Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees;
  2. A description of appropriate legal sanctions for violation of local, state, or federal laws for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol;
  3. A description of the health risks associated with the abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol use.
  4. A list of drug and alcohol programs (counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, and re-entry) that are available to employees or students; A clear statement that the Institution of Higher Learning (IHE) will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees for violations of the standards of conduct and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution.
A. Distribution

Upon enrollment for new students or upon hire for new employees, distribution shall follow a specific procedure. This policy is made clear in order to address such students and employees who either enroll or are hired at different points in the year. These provisions are addressed according to the following protocol:

New Students: Students shall receive an electronic copy of the policy at time of enrollment.

New Employees: All new employees (faculty or staff) shall receive a physical copy of the appropriate employee handbook as part of their welcome materials that are distributed by campus Personnel.

B. Ongoing Information

Modesto Junior College will also provide and display information found in the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program for ALL students, faculty and staff to view throughout the year as follows:

  • Posters & Signage
  • Class Schedules
  • College Catalogs
  • Online Educational Workshops
  • Digital Screens around college

II. Standards of Conduct

A. Board Policy

According to YCCD Board Policy 5500, the Chancellor has established procedures for the imposition of discipline on students in accordance with the requirements for due process of the federal and state law and regulations. The procedures shall clearly define the conduct that is subject to discipline, and shall identify potential disciplinary actions, including but not limited to the removal, suspension, or expulsion of a student. The Board shall consider any recommendation from the Chancellor for expulsion. The Board shall consider an expulsion recommendation in closed session unless the student requests that the matter be considered in a public meeting. Final action by the Board on the expulsion shall be taken at a public meeting. The procedures shall be made widely available to students through the college catalog and other means.

The following conduct shall constitute good cause for discipline, including but not limited to the removal, suspension or expulsion of a student.

  1. Causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical injury to another person.
  2. Possession, sale or otherwise furnishing any firearm, knife, explosive or other dangerous object, including but not limited to any facsimile firearm, knife, or explosive, unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the student has obtained written permission to possess the item from a District employee, which is concurred in by the college president.
  3. Unlawful possession, use, sale, offer to sell, or furnishing, or being under the influence of, any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the California Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind; or unlawful possession of, or offering, arranging or negotiating the sale of any drug paraphernalia, as defined in California Health and Safety Code Section 11014.5.
  4. Committing or attempting to commit robbery or extortion.
  5. Causing or attempting to cause damage to District property or to private property on campus.
  6. Stealing or attempting to steal District property or private property on campus, or knowingly receiving stolen District property or private property on campus.
  7. Willful or persistent smoking in any area where smoking has been prohibited by law or by regulation of the college or the District.
  8. Committing sexual harassment as defined by law or by District policies and procedures.
  9. Engaging in harassing or discriminatory behavior based on disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other status protected by law.
  10. Engaging in intimidating conduct or bullying against another student through words or actions, including direct physical contact; verbal assaults, such as teasing or name-calling; social isolation or manipulation; and cyberbullying.
  11. Willful misconduct which results in injury or death to a student or to college personnel or which results in cutting, defacing, or other injury to any real or personal property owned by the District or on campus.
  12. Disruptive behavior, willful disobedience, habitual profanity or vulgarity, or the open and persistent defiance of the authority of, or persistent abuse of, college personnel.
  13. Cheating, plagiarism (including plagiarism in a student publication), or engaging in other academic dishonesty.
  14. Dishonesty, forgery, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification; or knowingly furnishing false information to the District.
  15. Unauthorized entry upon or use of college facilities.
  16. Lewd, indecent or obscene conduct on District-owned or controlled property or at District sponsored or supervised functions.
  17. Engaging in expression which is obscene; libelous, or slanderous; or which so incites students as to create a clear and present danger of the commission of unlawful acts on college premises, or the violation of lawful District administrative procedures, or the substantial disruption of the orderly operation of the District.
  18. Persistent, serious misconduct where other means of correction have failed to bring about proper conduct.
  19. Unauthorized preparation, giving, selling, transfer, distribution, or publication, for any commercial purpose, of any contemporaneous recording of an academic presentation in a classroom or equivalent site of instruction, including but not limited to handwritten or typewritten class notes, except as permitted by any District policy or administrative procedure.
  20. Sexual assault, defined as actual or attempted sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent, regardless of the victim’s affiliation with the community college.
  21. Sexual exploitation, defined as a person taking sexual advantage of another person for the benefit of anyone other than that person without that person’s consent, regardless of the victim’s affiliation with the community college.

Except in response to conduct specified in subdivisions 20 and 21, no student shall be removed, suspended, or expelled unless the conduct for which the student is disciplined is related to college activity or college attendance.

B. Students – Modesto Junior College Policy (as outlined in YCCD Policy)

The ultimate goals of student conduct processes are student growth and development and the preservation of the educational environment. The Office of Student conduct works to support institutional and educational missions. Staff engages and educates students to be better citizens by guiding them towards ethical decision making and accountability. The purpose of the Office of Student Conduct is to identify and address problematic behaviors that may prevent a student/s from being successful in achieving their goals at MJC. Through due process, the Office of Student Conduct will strive to find a solution that promotes student success and campus safety.

While there are times when the Office of Student Conduct issues sanctions regarding violations of the Standards of Conduct at MJC, the main purpose of the student conduct process is to help students reach their academic and professional goals through an equitable process. Often times, the Office of Student Conduct will collaborate with the MJC Behavioral Intervention Team, MJC Office of Counseling, MJC Health Services, and Student Success & Support Program(SSSP) Specialists in order to ensure students are successful both in the student conduct process and in reaching their academic and personal goals.

C. Student Conduct Process-Classroom

Academic Violations (Academic Dishonesty) - Students who are accused of violating the Standards of Conduct in regards to Academic Honesty, are informed of the allegation of by their professor. If the student agrees to the allegation, then the teacher simply fills out a Student Conduct Report Form and click the box stating the student has agreed to the violation. The teacher will list the action taken and forward the report to their dean. The dean reviews the report and if all procedures all followed, the dean will forward the report them to Student Conduct Officer to officially close the case. The student will receive a letter from the Student Conduct Officer.

Should the student disagree with the allegations then the teacher fills out a Student Conduct Report Form and clicks the box stating the student has not agreed to the violation. The teacher will list suggested actions to be taken and forward the report to their dean. The dean shall meet with the student to review the case. If the student agrees to the wrongdoing, then the dean will forward the report to the Student Conduct Officer to officially close the case. The student will receive a letter from the Student Conduct Officer.

Should the student disagree with the allegations when meeting with the dean then the dean will forward the report to the Student Conduct Officer for an official hearing. The decision of the Student Conduct Officer is final. The student will receive a letter from the Student Conduct Officer.

Behavioral Violations (Disruptive Behavior) - Students who are accused of violating the Standards of Conduct in regards to Disruptive Behavior, are informed of the allegation of by their professor. If the student agrees to the allegation, then the teacher simply fills out a Student Conduct Report Form and click the box stating the student has agreed to the violation. The teacher will list the action taken and forward the report to their dean. The dean reviews the report and if all procedures all followed, the dean will forward the report them to Student Conduct Officer to officially close the case. The student will receive a letter from the Student Conduct Officer.

Should the student disagree with the allegations then the teacher fills out a Student Conduct Report Form and clicks the box stating the student has not agreed to the violation. The teacher will list suggested actions to be taken and forward the report to their dean. The dean shall meet with the student to review the case. If the student agrees to the wrongdoing, then the dean will forward the report them to Student Conduct Officer to officially close the case. The student will receive a letter from the Student Conduct Officer.

Should the student disagree with the allegations when meeting with the dean then the dean will forward the report the two Student Conduct Officer for an official hearing. The decision of the Student Conduct Officer is final. The student will receive a letter from the Student Conduct Officer.

Should a student's behavior be disruptive to a level that it makes learning not possible in a classroom, the teacher may remove the student from class for two class sessions. Before returning to class the student must meet with the area dean.

Student Conduct Policies and Procedures
D. Student Conduct Process

The following conduct, as outlined in YCCD Board Policy 5500, shall constitute good cause for discipline, including but not limited to the removal, suspension or expulsion of a student.

  1. 1. Causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical injury to another person.
  2. Possession, sale or otherwise furnishing any firearm, knife, explosive or other dangerous object, including but not limited to any facsimile firearm, knife, or explosive, unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the student has obtained written permission to possess the item from a District employee, which is concurred in by the college president.
  3. Unlawful possession, use, sale, offer to sell, or furnishing, or being under the influence of, any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division of the California Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind; or unlawful possession of, or offering, arranging or negotiating the sale of any drug paraphernalia, as defined in California Health and Safety Code Section 11014.5.
  4. Committing or attempting to commit robbery or extortion.
  5. Causing or attempting to cause damage to District property or to private property on campus.
  6. Stealing or attempting to steal District property or private property on campus, or knowingly receiving stolen District property or private property on campus.
  7. Willful or persistent smoking in any area where smoking has been prohibited by law or by regulation of the college or the District.
  8. Committing sexual harassment as defined by law or by District policies and procedures.
  9. Engaging in harassing or discriminatory behavior based on disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other status protected by law.
  10. Engaging in intimidating conduct or bullying against another student through words or actions, including direct physical contact; verbal assaults, such as teasing or name-calling; social isolation or manipulation; and cyberbullying.
  11. Willful misconduct which results in injury or death to a student or to college personnel or which results in cutting, defacing, or other injury to any real or personal property owned by the District or on campus.
  12. Disruptive behavior, willful disobedience, habitual profanity or vulgarity, or the open and persistent defiance of the authority of, or persistent abuse of, college personnel.
  13. Cheating, plagiarism (including plagiarism in a student publication), or engaging in other academic dishonesty.
  14. Dishonesty, forgery, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification; or knowingly furnishing false information to the District.
  15. Unauthorized entry upon or use of college facilities.
  16. Lewd, indecent or obscene conduct on District-owned or controlled property or at District-sponsored or supervised functions.
  17. Engaging in expression which is obscene; libelous, or slanderous; or which so incites students as to create a clear and present danger of the commission of unlawful acts on college premises, or the violation of lawful District administrative procedures, or the substantial disruption of the orderly operation of the District.
  18. Persistent, serious misconduct where other means of correction have failed to bring about proper conduct.
  19. Unauthorized preparation, giving, selling, transfer, distribution, or publication, for any commercial purpose, of any contemporaneous recording of an academic presentation in a classroom or equivalent site of instruction, including but not limited to handwritten or typewritten class notes, except as permitted by any District policy or administrative procedure.
  20. Sexual assault, defined as actual or attempted sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent, regardless of the victim’s affiliation with the community college.
  21. Sexual exploitation, defined as a person taking sexual advantage of another person for the benefit of anyone other than that person without that person’s consent, regardless of the victim’s affiliation with the community college.

III. Legal Sanctions

The Stanislaus County Sherriff’s Department enforces all federal and state laws and local ordinances.

A. Federal

The Federal Trafficking Penalties table, obtained from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration1, provides information regarding amounts of controlled substances and the penalties related to trafficking offenses based on quantity and offense. More information can be found here: https://www.dea.gov/drug-scheduling

B. State

In addition to the Federal Penalties listed in the tables provided, a complete listing of California substances, how they are placed on the schedule, and additional drug information can be found at: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB2783

IV. Biennial Review

Federal regulations require Modesto Junior College to conduct a Biennial Review of the Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program it has established. The Biennial Review of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program and Policies ensure the effectiveness and implementation of the program. Additionally, the Biennial Review ensures that the campuses enforce the disciplinary sanctions for violating standards of conduct consistently.

Contents of the Biennial Review include the following:

  • Description of Modesto Junior College;
  • Statement of Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) program goals;
  • Description of AOD program elements;
    • College Policies & Procedures
    • Notification method
    • Prevention classes
    • Resources for students
    • Resources for employees (EAP)
    • Outcome statistics
  • Procedures for distributing annual notification to students and employees;
  • Copies of the policies distributed to students and employees.

V. Measuring Outcomes

Modesto Junior will develop data collection and tracking measures to report program effectiveness. The following activities will be measured and evaluated:

  • Collect data and monitor violations and disciplinary sanctions imposed;
  • Collect data and monitor referrals for counseling or treatment services;
  • Collect data and monitor services provided on campus.
  • Means of data collection for reporting purposes:
    • Conduct periodic employee and student surveys;
    • Track employee services via referrals from Human Resources;
    • Track employee violations via Human Resources;
    • Track disciplinary sanctions imposed by Human Resources;
    • Track on-campus services utilized via Counseling and/or Health Services Offices;
    • Track student violations via Sheriff’s Office and Student Disciplinary Officers;
    • Track student disciplinary sanctions imposed via Student Disciplinary Officer.

The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol & Available Resources

I. Health Risks

According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, drug use & alcohol consumption carries both short-term and long-term health risks:

Short-Term Health Risks
  • Injuries, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, drownings, and burns.
  • Violence, including homicide, suicide, sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.
  • Alcohol poisoning, a medical emergency that results from high blood alcohol levels.
  • Risky sexual behaviors, including unprotected sex or sex with multiple partners. These behaviors can result in
  • unintended pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.
  • Miscarriage and stillbirth or fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) among pregnant women.
Long-Term Health Risks
  • High blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, and digestive problems.
  • Cancer of the breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, liver, and colon.
  • Learning and memory problems, including dementia and poor school performance.
  • Mental health problems, including depression and anxiety.
  • Social problems, including lost productivity, family problems, and unemployment.
  • Alcohol or drug dependence.

Reference: Center for Disease Control (CDC). (2019). Alcohol Use and Your Health, https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm

Prevalence

According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH):

  • Prevalence of Drinking: 58.0 percent of full-time college students ages 18–22 drank alcohol in the past month compared with 48.2 percent of other persons of the same age.
  • Prevalence of Binge Drinking: 37.9 percent of college students ages 18–22 reported binge drinking in the past month compared with 32.6 percent of other persons of the same age.
  • Prevalence of Heavy Drinking: 12.5 percent of college students ages 18–22 reported heavy alcohol use in the past month compared with 8.5 percent of other persons of the same age.
The following resources are available in MJC Health Services:
Pamphlet/Flyer Provider
“Don’t Fool Yourself”  California Smoker’s Helpline
“Friends in Recovery”  National Alliance on Mental Illness
“Mental Health Resources”  Modesto Junior College
“Drugs: What Everyone Should Know”  American College Health Association
“Over the Counter Drugs” Advancing Health Equity
“Marijuana”  Advancing Health Equity
“Drugs Shatter the Myths”  National Institute on Drug Abuse
“Drop the Drugs”  Stanislaus County
“Flavored and Nicotine-Free Vapes”  Unknown

II. Resources

A. Students:

Modesto Junior College Health Services is staffed by registered nurses to assist students with health-related concerns, including first-aid, illness prevention and wellness information. To access visits with a doctor or a mental health therapist on campus on, see one of our nurses for a referral.

During office hours and based on room availability, Health Services provides a private and clean lactation space for nursing mothers.

Registered Nurses available to see you for: *

  • Minor Illness/Injuries
  • Over-the-counter medications
  • Health Education and Health Counseling
  • TB (PPD) Screening
  • Vaccines (may be required for transfers to other colleges)
  • Blood Pressure Checks
  • Mental Health Referrals
  • Pregnancy Screening
  • Hemoglobin and Glucose Screening
  • Vision/Color Perception Screening
  • Referral to see the Doctor on Campus
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Sexual Health Referrals

For current charges, please click Fee Schedule.

*MJC Student ID/Photo ID, proof of current registration and zero balance required to receive services. To obtain your ID card, please visit the Student Development & Campus Life Offices.

Health Services Available

On-Campus Resources:

  • Alcohol and Other Drug Use: Universal screening for students requesting a nurse, physician, or mental health visit.
  • Referrals to community-based treatment programs
  • Brief individual therapy with Health Services
  • Crisis Counseling: Health Services offers same-day hour appointments pending provider availability. MJC
  • Counseling also accepts walk-ins for students in crisis.
  • Annual Health Fair
  • Healthy Living Presentations, Fall and Spring Semester

Community Resources:

Hotlines/Crisis Lines:

III. Mental Health Services

We are here to support you, especially during the COVID-19 outbreak. If you find yourself struggling, seek help.

When to ask for help: Stressors that may be affecting your mental health

  • Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-8255 or text "COURAGE" to 741741
  • MJC Crisis Counseling: Leave a voice mail at 209-575-6147 and Eric Garcia or Natalie Hassell, MJC Crisis Counselors, will return your call ASAP.
  • MJC Mental Health Therapy Appointments: 1-on-1, one-hour appointments with licensed mental health providers available.
    • To schedule, call us:
      • From 8-12pm, call 209-575-6281
      • From 1-5pm, call 209-575-6038
  • Warm Line: Offered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Residents can call the Warm Line when they are:
    • Having a hard time making it through the day - but are not in a crisis
    • Needing a caring listener to provide effective feedback to help explore options
    • Wanting some support, assistance and resources toward recovery
  • Stanislaus County; (209) 558-4600
  • Merced County: (209) 381-6819
  • San Joaquin County: (209) 468-3549
  • Pirate Care offers 24/7 free and unlimited access to a mental health provider from a mobile device or computer.
  • Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Training for Staff, Faculty, and Students
Employees
Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

Anthem EAP is a voluntary, confidential program that helps employees work through various challenges that might adversely affect job performance, health, and personal well-being to optimize an organization's success.

EAP services include assessments, counseling, and referrals for additional services to employees with personal and/or work-related concerns, such as stress, workplace issues, financial issues, legal issues, family problems, office conflicts, and alcohol and substance use disorders.

EAP services also often work with management and supervisors providing advanced planning for situations, such as organizational changes, legal considerations, emergency planning, and response to unique traumatic events.

See the informational flyers to the left about some of the services offered.

Or contact them 24/7:

  • By Phone: 1-800-999-7222
  • Online: Go to anthemEAP.com and enter SISC

The SISC medical plans provide an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). As part of the 2017 SISC EAP communication campaign, we are featuring a different EAP service each month. March’s featured service is Tobacco Free. The attached flyer provides more information.

Focusing on tobacco free, the SISC EAP provides these features:

  • Members are matched up with a coach specially trained to help with smoking cessation. The coach provides guidance, support, and encouragement.
  • Coaches are available by telephone or instant messaging (IM). They will help members identify triggers for tobacco use and prepare a customized action plan.
  • At the same time, members will get help managing their weight and meeting their personal fitness goals. The coach will use positive motivation to help members live better and gain control of their health.
Local Resources

2-1-1 of Stanislaus County - Connecting Stanislaus County residents to current health and human service information including food, housing, transportation, crisis services, etc.

Access from AT&T - Low cost internet for low income customers

Center for Human Services serves children, individuals and families in Stanislaus County through six core program areas: Mental Health Services, Shelter Services, Youth Services, School Based Services, Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Resource Centers.

Central Valley Opportunity Center - Energy Assistance- provides one payment per year to utility companies for low-income customers.

Interfaith Ministries - Helps individuals in need of food, clothing and other humanitarian services

MID CARES - Discount on your monthly MID bill

PG&E CARE Program - Discount on monthly utility bill

Haven Women's Center - serving all survivors of domestic violence, sexual abuse, and human trafficking.

Valley Mountain Regional Center (VMRC) - Free diagnosis and assessment services available to any person suspected of having developmental disability, such as intellectual disability, epilepsy, or autism

FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES FOR SCHEDULES I, II, III, IV, AND V (EXCEPT MARIJUANA)

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is a federal law enforcement agency under the United States Department of Justice, tasked with enforcing the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States. More information on the DEA, and federal laws can be found on the DEA website.

For the penalites for traficking, visit the DEA Drugs of Abuse Resource Guide